Can you make a checkerboard Text Adventure Strategy Game?

Checkerboard Strategy Games

So there are these strategy games, when you battle enemies, and you're only allowed certain moves. The field layout is usually in a checkerboard or hexagonal pattern.

I was wondering if you could make a text adventure like that? Just curious. There are grid based games like The Wumpus, so I thought it wouldn't be too much of a stretch.

(I also wondered if you could do a 4x game (EXplore, EXpand, EXploit, and EXterminate). It would have to be reeeaaallyyy small, though. Armies would be like 20 humans/monsters at most, the lands/territories would be like 100 rooms each. LOL)


I have experimented with 4x type games, both sci-fi and fantasy. Never really got very far, but that was lack of commitment on my part. This is the sci-fi one:
http://textadventures.co.uk/games/view/ohqyc_lfuuiqjsuwmvbkbw/star-empire-v0-1


the grid isn't as difficult as it seems (in just the basic creation of it, at least) once you learn the way it can be done, so, the problem is probably more with trying to do the coding of everything else, as that can probably be more complicated and/or difficult stuff.

coding in all the move patterns and all the rules for them, will probably be a bit difficult too... I'm not sure if I've got the skill to try to create a 'chess' or let alone even a 'checkers' game...

the basic method for the grid:

you literally give every room a 'x_coordinate_integer_attribute' and 'y_coordinate_integer_attribute (and also if you want 3d, a 'z_coordinate_integer_attribute' as well), you can then use them for what you want to do, for example, having a monster move towards you, you'd compare the room's (that you're currently within) coordinates with the monster's (that it is currently within) room's coordinates, and based upon them, that's what room you move the monster to, an example below of it ('monster pathfinding'):

<turnscript name="global_turnscript">
  <enabled />
  <script>
    <![CDATA[
      if (monster.parent.x_coordinate_integer_attribute > player.parent.x_coordinate_integer_attribute) {
        destination_x_coordinate_integer_variable = monster.parent.x_coordinate_integer_attribute - 1
      } else if (monster.parent.x_coordinate_integer_attribute < player.parent.x_coordinate_integer_attribute) {
        destination_x_coordinate_integer_variable = monster.parent.x_coordinate_integer_attribute + 1
      } else if (monster.parent.x_coordinate_integer_attribute = player.parent.x_coordinate_integer_attribute) {
        destination_x_coordinate_integer_variable = monster.parent.x_coordinate_integer_attribute
      }

      if (monster.parent.y_coordinate_integer_attribute > player.parent.y_coordinate_integer_attribute) {
        destination_y_coordinate_integer_variable = monster.parent.y_coordinate_integer_attribute - 1
      } else if (monster.parent.y_coordinate_integer_attribute < player.parent.y_coordinate_integer_attribute) {
        destination_y_coordinate_integer_variable = monster.parent.y_coordinate_integer_attribute + 1
      } else if (monster.parent.y_coordinate_integer_attribute = player.parent.y_coordinate_integer_attribute) {
        destination_y_coordinate_integer_variable = monster.parent.y_coordinate_integer_attribute
      }

      foreach (room_object_variable, game.room_objectlist_attribute) {
        if (room_object_variable.x_coordinate_integer_variable = destination_x_coordinate_integer_variable and room_object_variable.y_coordinate_integer_variable = destination_y_coordinate_integer_variable) {
          player.parent = room_object_variable
        }
      }
    ]]>
  </script>
</turnscript>

explanation of how it works:

let's say we got a 10x10 grid, with the lower left corner room having the coordinates of (0,0) which also is the room of the player. And in the upper right corner room having the coordinates of (10,10), which also is the room of the monster. each turn, we check the room coordinates of the two of them and move the monster accordingly. let's say that the player doesn't move, just to make this easier to understand how it works. for the monster (at room:10,10) to get to the player (at room:0,0), we do this each turn:

x: 10 > 0 ---> 10 - 1 = 9 ---> 9 > 0 ---> 9 - 1 = 8 ---> 8 > 0 ---> etc ---> 0
y: 10 > 0 ---> 10 - 1 = 9 ---> 9 > 0 ---> 9 - 1 = 8 ---> 8 > 0 ---> etc ---> 0

and if the player moves, it doesn't change anything, as the formula/method works whether the player moves or doesn't move.

that's just one example of applying grid arithmetic-comparison


now if you want to make a game as complex as this (see below) in quest... that's going to take quite some skill... lol

ht.tp://luct.tacticsogre.com

here's a 'lets play' yt vid, so you can see its grid battles: ht.tps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XzuigmSKnw (8:00 is when the grid battle starts, so you can see a bit of what it is like, and you can find more vids, to see more advanced battles when you got magic and etc stuff you can do in the grid battles)

(great site for this awesome but now old game: OgreBattle series, Tactics Ogre: Let Us Cling Together, PS1)
( ht.tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tactics_Ogre:_Let_Us_Cling_Together )


@HK
I've seen a Pokémon Nuzlocke (a type of play style, you pretend once a Pokémon faints, it's dead for good), that was based off chess: Chesslocke. There's pawns, horses, Queens, and everything!
If I recall, the riles are based on the type. Pawns can only go forward, Kings/or Queen could go all directions... I forget the rest. I suppose it would be easier for you, if you knew how to play chess!


battle chess was an old school game, that was cool back in the day, having different animations for when you take a piece by another piece... lol... brings back some old memories... like the 'rook/castle/tower' would eat say a 'pawn'.... (and the queen was "sexy" back then... lol.... graphics have gotten so much better now... and better... ahem... body motion physics too... ahem, lol)

let me just see if there's a vid of it... lol

ht.tps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaQUQjmH1Vs

hehe... old school... lol (I had completely forgotten about this type of game that I played as a kid... until this thread/post of yours! thanks!)


HK likes chess and gundam wing's relena and dorothy, so this is such a cool pic, hehe:

ht.tps://i.pinimg.com/736x/f8/8c/92/f88c927c599506c1d16dcb647aaafc18--gundam-wing-mobile-suit.jpg

foreground: Dorothy Catalonia (military genius)
background: Relena Peacecraft (not to be underestimated)


You object programmers make it sound so hard!!!
You could loop this for each creature, or make it a function that moves the creature
(Pseudo code... not complete)
place everyone...
Creature.X=6
Creature.Y=9
Player.X=2
Player.Y=2
(the function)
if{ Creature.X> Player.X ){
Creature.X=Creature.X-1
}
if {Creature.X<Player.X){
Creature.X=Creature.X+1
}
If(Creature.Y>Player.Y){
Creature.Y=Creature.Y-1
}
if (Creature.Y<Player.Y) {
Creature.Y=Creature.Y+1
}

Done...
And if this was a function, you could pass the Creature's X & Y and could add a Target X & Y if you wanted the creature
to chase after someone other than the player.
Actually, after reading through all those 1/4 mile long variable names... It does the same...
But with short names...


1/4 mile long variable names

I always want to tell HK to shorten those. Very hard to soak the code in at first glance...

...but I don't think I'd have grasped the concepts as quickly, were it not for HK writing everything out that way.

Daunting? Definitely.

But it makes me examine the code one line at a time, which is what I need to be doing. Otherwise, mistakes galore!


DL,

I'm pre-ordering your Visual Basic chess game.

In fact, I just did.


HK, why do you hide/encrypt your links? Why is it "ht.tps:"?


Supposedly, it's polite ettiquete, as hyperlinks can cause slowing down of the destination site and/or posting site, and/or can be used for sending malware/adware too, to the destination site (the malware/adware searches for hyperlinks, and use them to send their malware/adware to those sites). I don't really understand it myself, someone tried explaining it to me... but as can see from me trying to explain it here, lol, I didn't really understand it all that well. I've been trying to get in the habit of it, and have been pretty good with it, for the most part.


ya, my descriptive labels/names... get annoying even for me... they're much harder to read... but the pros I get from it, outweight the negs from it, meh.

you definately want labels/names to be as short as possible... but there's the human factor too, they got to be able to know what is going on (and be able to follow and understand and troubleshoot and modify) with your code...

I've not found a good system yet for shortening the labels/names... I just endure the annoying negs of it, as the positives of it, for me, outweighs the negs of it.

with my original combat code... I used abrevs... very very very short labels/names... and that was a disaster, lol... I kept getting them confused with each other, mixing them up, and forgetting what they even meant/stood-for, lol.

here's some of the pros (for me) of being descriptive, as I have this type of stuff in my game:

// see how the descriptiveness (longer labels/names) prevents me from having errors due to not having unique names/labels, and I know exactly what I'm working with (though I do have to slow down and read it carefully, which indeed is annoying for me as it is for everyone else, lol):

<function name="strength_function" parameters="strength_integer_parameter">
  strength_integer_variable = strength_object.strength_integer_attribute + 50
  msg (strength_integer_variable)
  msg (strength_integer_parameter)
  msg (strength_object.strength_integer_attribute)
</function>

<object name="strength_object">
  <inherit name="strength_type" />
  <attr name="strength_integer_attribute" type="int">100</attr>
  <attr name="strength_string_attribute" type="string">strong</attr>
  <attr name="strength_stringlist_attribute" type="simplestringlist">weak;average;strong</attr>
</object>

<type name="strength_type">
  <attr name="type_string_attribute" type="string">primary_attribute</attr>
</type>

what would I name/label these things if I otherwise didn't use this system? strength (string), str (int), STRENGTH (Object), STR (stringlist), Strength (Object Type / Type), ???

until I can come up with something better, I'm stuck with my long/descriptive labels/names... sighs

DL's code is doing the same as my 'object' coding.

that's the problem with higher vs lower languages...

higher languages are more scale'able, modify'able, easier to trouble-shoot/fix, more human friendly, but they require a lot more data/scripting/memory/etc and are thus also slower too.

and lower languages are the opposite of the above


but as can be seen, higher languages are the norm, as they're more "production" oriented (see what I said about them above), but there's definately still an extreme importance to the low level languages too, in fact, a lot of high level languages use low level languages underneath, so that they can do things that would otherwise be too slow to do, if they didn't hiddenly use a low level language to do it. And of course any thing that is critical (life or death: for example: controls response time for a car or air-plane or jet) and/or have a limited volume (thus limited computer components, you got less of them, so they got to be really efficient to do the work of many of them, while at the same speed too: imagine 1 person making a game vs a 100-person team making a game)

an example:

in Assembly Language (one of the lowest languages), it literally takes 6 lines of code to do the same 1 line of code in a higher level language (though, it's actually doing a lot more lines underneath, but you, the human, only have to do 1 line, vs having to do 6 lines in Assembly Language). As can be seen, higher languages are the norm, as they're more production/human-friendly. Less work/lines for us humans to do (especially as we scale more and more up with what we're doing).


I was saying the link didn't work. It says the page doesn't exist, or something.


ah... my bad...

you got to edit it in the url:

highlight, copy, and paste it into the url, and then just delete the dot/period from the 'ht.tp'

ht.tps://www.google.com
// highlight, copy, and paste the above into the url

// so it looks like this, URL:

ht.tps://www.google.com

then highlight or position-input-cursor-line-to-the-right-of-the-period-dot, and delete/remove out the period/dot from the 'ht.tp', so it now looks like this:

URL:

https://www.google.com
// err... this is going to be as a link here, lol, but you get it...

then, hit enter... and it'll take you to google site


I just put in that dot/period to prevent it from being recognized as a hyperlink, you you got to manually remove it, before it'll work within the URL, as the URL is coding too... it has to be exact typing/syntax too.

the 'http/https/www/com/etc-etc-etc' are like commands, so they got to be typed exactly:

ERRORS, wrong syntax:
ht.tp
ht tp
httpM
htMtp
ht.tps
c.om
cMom
ww.w
w.ww
wwwA
wAww


here's a vid that explains the basics of the internet pretty well:

ht.tp://www.dontfeartheinternet.com/01-not-tubes/
(HK edit 2: correct link now up, lol --- I hope)

main page (there's quite a few vids on learning html and css / making a webpage/website):

ht.tp://www.dontfeartheinternet.com

other links for Networking info:

ht.tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Wide_Web
ht.tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertext_Transfer_Protocol

ht.tps://imgur.com/CYcMlns (OSI model)
ht.tps://www.petri.com/images/osi_model.JPG (OSI model)

ht.tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICANN
ht.tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Institute_of_Electrical_and_Electronics_Engineers
ht.tps://www.ietf.org/rfc.html

this is also a good site that I like for the basics on computers, internet, and etc stuff:

ht.tp://www.inetdaemon.com

and this looks like a really good site too (link to specifically about the domain name heirarchy system: '.com/edu' type of stuff):

ht.tps://www.novell.com/documentation/dns_dhcp/?page=/documentation/dns_dhcp/dhcp_enu/data/behdbhhj.html

if you want to learn some of the basic info on some of this various computer stuff


jmne,

HK says, "WATCH THIS VIDEO!"


I don't know how to spell "etiquette".


Sorry, HK!


you definately want labels/names to be as short as possible... but there's the human factor too, they got to be able to know what is going on (and be able to follow and understand and troubleshoot and modify) with your code...

If you want to track what each variable is, you could try this:. Append an underscore, the type as a single letter (i, o, s, l, d for integer, object, string, list, dictionary) and, er, other type (v, a, p for variable, attribute, parameter) as a single letter (you could consider doing this as a prefix which is a more common convention). Name functions with capitals to make it clear it is a function (and following the convention in the library). For objects, name them in lower case with no qualifier and it will be clear they are objects.

<function name="Strength" parameters="strength_ip">
  strength_iv = strength.strength_ia + 50
  msg (strength_iv)
  msg (strength_ip)
  msg (strength.strength_ia)
</function>

it is much easier to take in at a glance what is going on in my opinion, and you can still check the suffix to see what something is.


Agree with Pixie.

I would go with these...
player.maxhp
this.iv
this.ev
this.internalv
this.externalv

@HK I've heard of Battle Chess (also YouTube), but I've never seen a Let's Play of it.


@ jmnevil54:

not sure if you saw this in my previous post (it was a late edit to my post, lol):

now if you want to make a game as complex as this (see below) in quest... that's going to take quite some skill... lol

ht.tp://luct.tacticsogre.com

here's a 'lets play' yt vid, so you can see its grid battles: ht.tps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XzuigmSKnw (8:00 is when the grid battle starts, so you can see a bit of what it is like, and you can find more vids, to see more advanced battles when you got magic and etc stuff you can do in the grid battles)

(great site for this awesome but now old game: OgreBattle series, Tactics Ogre: Let Us Cling Together, PS1)
( ht.tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tactics_Ogre:_Let_Us_Cling_Together )


this game has a lot of cool features for a grid based game, though, obviously that'd make it very hard to code and game design, lol. Obviously, as a Text Adventure, you wouldn't have all the fancy graphics and animation, but you can do all of the mechanics of the grid battles and all of the other stuff in it too. Quest is capable of it... but that means we got to be capable of it... and that's not me, lol. Not that good yet, and it's a lot of work too, not much different than a normal/traditional rpg game.


I've gotten used to my naming/labeling convention... and I certainly can shorten up the stuff, but I've had bad experiences with doing abrevs and shortening things up, and I know the conventions with upper and lower case, but I hate doing upper case, as it's so easy to mess them up, for me. I've just gotten used to it, and for me, it's really not that hard for me, as I've done so much harder reading comprehension/analysis, than my descriptive conventions... nothing stands out more than 'Mary Shelley's Frankenstein', where EVERY single word, you got to look up in the dictionary, and even the brutal/gore'y action/battles scenes... are... 'wordy', lol

also, I've changed conventions so much... it's really a pain... lol... lots of re-typing... to change old conventions of code over to new ones... lol

this is what I've been using... so, I'm stuck with it for now... as I'm not interested in re-doing all of my code that I've done, lol. Not anytime soon anyways, and I probably won't until I find a really good/great convention that I like / works for me. Despite it's flaws, my descriptive convention works, thus far I've not encountered any problems with it...


DL,
I'm pre-ordering your Visual Basic chess game.
In fact, I just did.

How about this for an idea...
Man Eating Rabbit...
You are dropped into a circular pit that is 20 spaces across (a square pit would be easer)
You will need to outrun the rabbit for 10 turns.
You can only move 1 space as a time, but the rabbit can make several hops per turn.
(Can Quest do square roots???)
(Chest may come later.)


Well, a normal calculator can do square roots, (and if I had a calculator without that feature, I could do the guess until you find the answer trick), so I don't see why not. Square roots are like, 10^-2, and stuff...

(Chest may come later.)

Use SqRt to get a square route. If you want an int, use Round on the result.


Thanks...
What about:
Sin, Cos, and Tan???


Edited:

Yes they work too (note that they use radians, not degrees). And Asin, Acos and Atan. And Log and Exp too.


One thing I've wondered about...
People use degrees... Why where computer programed to use radians???!!!


OK, SqRt does not seam to work...
OK, so it does work...


Computers use radians because mathematicians use radians. If you try to do calculus with trig functions, using degrees results in a stack of conversion factors getting smeared over everything. (Also because the formula you use to calculate sin/cos works in radians)


That explains why I had trouble in Algebra 2. For the middle of the year, I had to find the sin, cos, or tan, using a triangle's degrees. That, and I did not like the substitute teacher, and he did not explain anything, even when asked. The other teacher was pregnant, so he was called in. He did not help with students' questions 50% of the time, it was only when he was talking during the lesson (because helping other times would be cheating.....).


I was taught in degrees... I find radians confusing...
360'=1 circle
90'=1/4 circle
a square has 4 sides, the total of the 4 angles=360'
a triangle has 3 sides, the total of the 3 angles=180'
what's confusing???


Man Eating Rabbit

COMING SOON!


I was taught to use radians because degrees aren't really numbers (so said the teacher, and, if there's a valid argument, I'm too lazy (or uninformed) to come up with one).

So, since π is 180°:

Degrees to Radians

degrees/1 * π/180

  <command name="toRadian">
    <pattern>#text# to radian;ToRadian(#text#)</pattern>
    <script>
      if (IsInt(text)){
      degrees = ToInt(text)
      degreesToRadians (text)
      }
      else{
        msg ("Error:  You must enter a number.")
      }
    </script>
  </command>

  <function name="degreesToRadians" parameters="degrees"><![CDATA[
    x = (ToInt(degrees) * pi)/180
    msg (x)
  ]]></function>

Question. Why do you need degrees, sin, cos, tan, and radians? Is it just for math purposes, for when you're programming? Are you making an ammunition/war game? How would that even work???

...Are you stacking rooms??? Are you messing with the "up" direction???


Who me? Or DL?

I was just hooking DL up with the tools he may need. (He's a BASIC programmer. This object-oriented stuff makes his scales all dried-up and itchy sometimes!)

...and I don't know how he does what he does, but the programs of his that I've seen are pretty darn slick!

Why are you so awesome, DL? Were you just born with it? Nature or nurture, sir?


Now, where's HK?

I bet he's got some input concerning matters such as this...


You are approaching an intersection...
Do you make a 90 degree right turn, or a 1/2 π left turn?
A 90' turn I know... But how tight of a turn is a π/2 one???


Even on Star Trek, the captain orders a heading of 319 mark 5 ...
Not 2.574 mark .0012
Degrees... not radians!


π/2 * 180/π = 90°


DarkLizerd

Question. Why do you need degrees, sin, cos, tan, and radians? Is it just for math purposes, for when you're programming? Are you making an ammunition/war game? How would that even work???

...Are you stacking rooms??? Are you messing with the "up" direction???


on Star Trek, the captain orders a heading of 319 mark 5 ...

...and the computer converts it to "5.56760031 rad, then travel 5 times the speed of sound".


Are you stacking rooms, DL? (He might be, jmne. It will probably still be entertaining, no matter what.)


jmnevil45:
Degrees is what I was taught. Degrees I know.
I know that 45' is half way between flat to the ground and straight up...

K.V.
Actually.. the first number is the horizontal, mark is for the vertical angle...


Oh, damn... I thought you meant mach 5...

Good thing I'm not the computer! The Minnow... I mean the Enterprise would be lost!


With my spelling, you had a very good chance of being right...
(or unnoticed typos...)
Mach 5 in space??? you are not in any hurry are you?
Moving that "fast" you would get run over by even the slowest of objects in interplanetary space...


Is it even possible to break the speed of sound when there is no sound?

And how far can a dog run into the woods?


Yes...
1/2 way.


Ha-ha! Well played!


So mach 5 in space is the equivalent of 54 MPH on the interstate? (I was stuck behind that car for about 10 miles earlier, with a never-ending convoy to my left. (Mumble, grumble, curse.))


No. I'm asking why you'd use degrees for a grid system.

How do you make a grid system, anyway?

(And actually, due to me watching the Science Channel, I know it's impossible to go past the speed of light, but nonetheless the speed of light itself can be manipulated by black holes and worm holes.

Of course, science fiction doesn't usually take actual science into account, especially science that didn't exist at the time the art was created!)


The degrees is for a different project where you are in command of a starship and you need to set the headings in degrees, and SqRt would be used to determine distance involved...
Altho, I am using SqRt to determine distance in the Man-eating rabbit program I'm working on right now...
I am up to the point of determining how the rabbit moves...


Man-eating Rabbit is now released...
A 1 night creation...
http://textadventures.co.uk/games/view/3grsuewo0umu_fio2bvvsg/man-eating-rabbit


(filler, for getting my edited post, updated/posted)


HK is not getting involved as HK hates math... lol

try getting used to polar coordinates (length/radius and angle) after learning cartesian coordinates (x and y / grid) ...

ht.tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polar_coordinate_system

(HK did not have fun with Calc 2 for his second time... maybe a 3rd time "a charm", I'll get a good grade in the class)


radians are not easy to get accustomed to, as well. I'm always having to translate them as degrees to understand what they are, lol

'the unit circle is my BFF' lolololol... I can never get it memorized... sighs...

ht.tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_circle#/media/File:Unit_circle_angles_color.svg


unfortunately, math-equation-wise, it's smoother to use radians, just as it is with decimal/metric/base-10 system, but degrees and american/viking (base 12) makes more sense for us as humans.

base 10 (metric/decimal) vs base 12 (american/viking)

base 10 factors: 2 and 5
base 12 factors: 2 and 3

3 (triangles) is much more useful than 5 (pentagons)


'mach' is just compared to the speed of sound: mach 5 = speed of sound x 5

ht.tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_sound


sound isn't very fast, light is the "max speed", why you see lightning long before you hear the thunder/boom, why you're incinerated/vaporized/ionized before the sound wave crushes you, in a nuclear blast/bomb/explosion, lol.


sound doesn't exist in space, as sound requires a medium, which is only 1% of space (like how particles make up 1% of an atom, 99% of the atom is empty)

also, the "speed of sound" isn't a constant, it depends upon the medium it's traveling through, as does all types of speeds. A bullet travels faster/farther in the air than it does in a liquid than it does in a solid

... well... I guess... a vacuum (no medium, like outerspace) would be/determine something's true/actual speed, but not everything can exist within a vacuum (no medium), as some things require a medium (matter/particles) to exist, like sound.

"Sound" is literally air molecules bumping against each other and/or via vibrating, so no air molecules (outerspace / vacuums), no sound.

things that require a medium, are also affected by that medium (in terms of their speed through it). solids have the most resistance/friction (earth), then liquids (water), then gases (air), and lastly (but it's not a medium), a vacuum (outerspace).

sending a rocket up into outerspace from east US, traveling through outerspace, and back down to west europe, is faster than taking an air-plane (and probably a jet too... I think, surely?). As the air is much more resistant than the vacuum of outerspace.

it's the same with "weight", depending on the distance from the center of mass, you weigh more at sea level than you do on mt everest (and you weigh a ton more at the bottom of the mariana trench or the most at the center of mass itself, the earth's core), but this means that you can use human weight as the same as mass, as we're all using the same distance multiplier on our weight, as we're all at the same significant distance from the center of the earth.

a "g-force" is a comparison to your normal (human elevation/distance-from-center-of-mass-core-of-earth living) weight

if I weigh normally 200 lbs, than a force of "5 Gs" is 1000 lbs, which, g-forces can be generated through roller coasters and fighter jets (and etc like stuff: acceleration: pos and neg). There's vertical Gs and lateral Gs, we can withstand much more vertical Gs (as its in-line with and because of having our spines-bones), than we can withstand lateral Gs. Lateral Gs make you vomit quickly, and beyond that... death, as your internal organs are slammed and crushed into/against your body, killing you.


as to advanced physics...

there's only one way to physically go faster than the speed of light:

when there is no space-time (when there is no physical existence), lol (the big bang/inflation)

however, there's a way to cheat, but/thus, it's not technically/physically going faster than the speed of light:

space-time is warp'able, think of space-time (physical existence), as a rubber band, and you're on that rubber band (as an ant).

imagine that the rubber band is cut, so it's a line, you're at one end of the rubber band and you want to get to the other end of the rubber band.

let's say the normal/natural length of our rubber band line is 1 foot long, and let's say it takes you as an ant, 1 minute to physically walk from one end of it to the other

but, what would happen if we were to stretch that rubber band line to 10 feet long, now how long would it take to physically walk from one end to the other? 10 minutes

now, what were to happen if we were to shorten/constrict the rubber band line, so short that the two ends are at the same place, the "start line" and the "finish line" are one and the same. how long would it take to walk from one end to the other end? 0 time: instantaneously, as you're already there, right at the beginning, as the start is the finish.

see space-time is warp'able (adjustable) just like that rubber band, so instead of physically traveling 23843984 light years... you jsut warp space-time, causing your destination to shorten/constrict/move to you, instead. You don't have to move at all, the destination comes to you.

and it gets more freaky... as the "time" involved is actually "time travel" physics as well...

physical existence (space-time: distance-aka-space and time are one and the same) is really freaky, we don't understand it at all, as the more we think we understand it, the more weird and not-understood it becomes.

Einstein is known for e=mc^2: matter and energy are one and the same thing, not 2 separate things

But, his greater discovery is "space-time": space (distance) and time are one and the same thing, not 2 separate things, as if you change space (distance) you change time, and if you change time, you change space (distance). This is shown through his "time dilation effect", though it's not as well known as e=mc^2

space (distance) = time

let's say that each step takes 1 second

in 10 seconds, how many steps have I taken? 10 steps
in 10 steps, how many seconds have passed? 10 seconds

if you warp/change distance/space, you warp/change time
if you warp/change time, you warp/change distance/space

Dimensions 1-4 are one thing ("existence" = distance+time), not 4 separate things
("distance" and "space" are the same words, they're the same thing, they're interchange'able, I prefer distance, but space is always used instead)
(0D: point :: no distance/space)
(1D: length :: line :: length :: distance)
(2D: length, width :: plane :: area)
(3D: length, width, height :: space/spacial :: volume)
(4D: length, width, height, time :: space+time / spacial+temporal :: volume + time)

space (distance) and time, are the same thing, not separate things. "time" is a unit of distance, as are "length", "width", and "height", units of distance. "time" is a unit of time, as are "length", "width", and "height", units of time. Space (distance) and time are the same thing.

as I already described space-time as being warp'able as a rubber band...

now think of it as a rubber sheet

imagine dropping a heavy bowling ball onto that rubber sheet, what happens? it is stretched downwards, making a deep hole/valley/crater/whatever you want to call it, lol

let's flip it upside down, as that's a much better/familar analogy for explaining how it works:

if you take a hole/valley/crater/etc and flip it upside down... you got a .... mountain, and everyone understands a mountain!

the heavier the object, the deeper hole, the bigger/taller the mountain, right? (hopefully, you're with me)

if I drop a feather onto the our rubber sheet, we have no change, the flat sheet remains flat (no mountain, not even a tiny hill). The distance across it is the same as the distance around it.

but, if we were to drop a black hole onto our rubber sheet, we got a really deep hole/crater/valley/etc, and thus a really tall mountain. It'd take us a very long long long long time to walk up the mountain and back down the mountain to get to the other side, compared to walking around the super tall mountain. More time occurs traveling over the super tall mountain than in going around it. In other words... if you're on the super tall moutain, more time occurs, you've aged a lot, compared to if you're on the outside (walking around the mountain) of the mountain. The person walking around the mountain ages much less than the person walking over the mountain.

if you're on the earth, you age more than a person on a space station going around the earth. Astronauts come home a few seconds (or nana seconds, as the earth really isn't that massive/dense compared to everything else, gravity is a very weak force, it requires tremendous mass/density to have significant effects, though this is very possible within the universe/outerspace, laughs) of less aging (being younger) than everyone else has aged (being older) on the earth.

link: ht.tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_dilation

so, if you orbited a black hole, you would never age...

which is interesting, as I've never heard any thoughts on this when past the event horizon... they just talk about the physical physics involved (stretching apart into particles), but not about time/aging... as you'd become hyper-old/hyper-aging... meh, someone needs to ask theoretical physicists about what happens with time/aging... lol.

Is data preserved within a black hole, or is it destroyed (via aging)... lol

actually... hmm.... within the event horizon... it would be destroyed by aging... but it'd still be projected out as normal forever....

and when entering the black hole, it gets preserved forever... but if its destroyed... then its not there for it to be entering the black hole... lol.

(HK edit: data gets preserved forever as a projection within the event horizon, but the data gets actually destroyed by hyper-aging, and when it enters the black hole, we've no idea what happens... lol. I got confused with data preservation, for some stupid reason I said it occurs when entering the black hole too, which was incorrect. We've no idea what happens within a black hole, but the data does get preserved forever as a projection within the event horizon, despite that it actually gets destroyed by hyper-aging)

okay... the projection data (from entering into past the event horizon) is preserved... but the actual data is destroyed, as the hyper-aging destroys it before it enter the black hole... hmm...

fascinating.... HK... nerds out... lol


HK wants our scientist's thoughts on this stuff !!!

XanMag, we (err, I, anyways) want/need your expertise/knowledge on this science stuff! lol :D


HK wants a 'grav ship' so badly, hehe :D

from Alpha Centauri game, the (now old) scientific sci-fi civilization game: ht.tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sid_Meier%27s_Alpha_Centauri

and the uber-expert guide by genius 'vel' user: ht.tp://alphacentauri2.info/index.php?action=downloads;sa=view;down=91


a "grav ship" shields you from the force of acceleration, which is what actually kills you, not the external impact of a crash/stop/breaking. So, with a grav ship you can go really fast and stop instanteuosly without being killed (and vice versa). E-M can shield/contain radiation/light, not sure if or what can shield/contain other forces, like that of acceleration... can other forces/waves be shielded/contained? or is E-M (and gravity too, of course) and light/radiation the only thing? Are there other things (or forces) that do effect (shield/contain) other various forces?


NOTE TO SELF:

Add ASK HK ABOUT MATH to the next revision of Pixie's Quest.


"I don't like math."
Talks about math like he does everything.

sending a rocket up into outerspace from east US, traveling through outerspace, and back down to west europe, is faster than taking an air-plane (and probably a jet too... I think, surely?). As the air is much more resistant than the vacuum of outerspace.

In theory, at least. But then you have to figure in the cost of to let ship fuel, and then convince NASA that it's worthwhile to use space travel to to to places on Earth, instead of space!


Do 2 dimensional images have 4 coordinates, and do 3 dimensional images have 12 coordinates?

I was just thinking, a 2 dimensional image has up and down, left and right. But if you look at a cube, it has up and down and left and right one the front, and then up and down and left and right on the sides, and up and down and left and right on the top and bottom!

So theoretically, 4 * 3 = 12, therefore, should a machine making a 3D image have 3 times the energy intake than a 2D image?
...just curious.


HK... Maybe you would like this page..
http://www.projectrho.com/public_html/rocket/index.php


@ Jnmevil54:

ah, I think I see what you mean. Yes, there's only 3 units of distance (3D: length, width, height), but you're right in that each of them needs a 'min' and 'max' (if you use this method, see below, as there's another way as well), so it's 3 x 2 = 6 coordinate VARIABLES in coding (well you could also just use the 3 units of distance, and a multiplier too, meh, there's actually a few methods, lol), and almost, a 3D would have 8 (2^3) coordinates (vertexes / corners) in total, an example:

a cube (3D, shape), from origin (0,0,0) to (10,10,10):

(one of my teachers, had us use/create 2 plastic grids put perpendicular to each other and yawn for our shapes, to help us comprehend it visually+tangibly+directly as a 3D/spacial model)

  1. (x_min = 0 , y_min = 0, z_min = 0)
  2. (x_min = 0, y_min = 0, z_max = 10)
  3. (x_min = 0, y_max = 10, z_min = 0)
  4. (x_min = 0, y_max = 10, z_max = 10)
  5. (x_max = 10, y_min = 0, z_min = 0)
  6. (x_max = 10, y_min = 0, z_max = 10)
  7. (x_max = 10, y_max = 10, z_min = 0)
  8. (x_max = 10, y_max = 10, z_max = 10)

here's two ways to do it:

for a 10 x 10 square (plane, 2D), an example:
x_min = 0
x_max = 10
y_min = 0
y_max = 10

or, using the center of the shape and offsets/radius (example using an angular shape):

x_center = 5
y_center = 5
x_radius = 5
y_radius = 5

our shape is a square, with its center at (5,5), and a radius of 5 for both coordinates (as it's a square), so our square is from the origin (0,0) to (10,10)


oh yes, 3D animation graphics takes a powerful computer with lots of speed/performance and memory!

a quick search found this, which does give a basic explanation/idea into it:

https://www.regent.edu/acad/undergrad/pdf/animation_hardware_requirements.pdf

also, the 3D animation graphics software is very expensive as well


super computers are required to do scientific modeling/predictions, having/needing their uber-high performance/speed and memory.


here's some quick searches on how to do graphics programming, if you're interested (using Python language for the resources):

ht.tp://anh.cs.luc.edu/python/hands-on/3.1/handsonHtml/graphics.html
ht.tps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R39vTAj1u_8


if you're interested, I can help with learning graphics programming using Python full-bore language (its free, downloadable for windows, not sure about Apple computers if it can use it or not) (I can help you with getting it set up if there's no complications, at least), as I can also provide some graphics coding, and you can see it in action, and explain it to you on how it's working.


yes, while earth's gravity is weak, for our current fuel technology (organic: fossil fuels), it's very expensive. I was just talking about time/speed alone, not other factors of consideration in-for actual practicality of doing it or not. We don't have anti-matter warp drives/engines yet (star trek), lol.

(this is why we want to have a colony/space-ship-launching-station on the moon, as the moon's gravity is even weaker than the earth's, meaning that it's much less expensive in fuel cost to launch from the moon, as opposed from the earth)

another creative idea is from Total Recall (2012) movie, in having a (or rather multiple) tunnel/elevator through the earth, lol ("digging to china" from the US), but of course this is completely sci-fi with our current technology, as there's so much science issues to deal with in going into the earth... lol.


@ DarkLizard:

we already have the ability to colonize mars... it can be done... lol. But, colonizing the moon first, is more important, then we can colonize mars, afterwards.


NASA, after the success with the Moon missions, were already training, with habitat simulators, for a manned Mars mission...
True, a settlement on the Moon would be the training and practice for the people and testing for the equipment, and working out the logistics of keeping everyone alive. After all, once you leave Earth, you can't pop over to the local hardware store for that box of nails you forgot!!!

@jmnevil54 Does Man-eating Rabbit fit the bill for a checkerboard text game?

As for degrees over radians:
using degrees, Sin and Cos provides the values to convert to distance traveled in any direction.
If a person is moving at 1 units per turn at 45' from "North", then:
Sin(45)=.707 and Cos(45)=.707, so, they will travel 0.707 spaces North and 0.707 spaces East, for a total distance of 1 space.
Or, at a speed of 10, they would be at 7.07 North by 7.07 East, and 10 spaces from where they started.
How would that be figured using radians without a conversion factor?


@DarkLizerd Yes, I think it would. And depending on the grid/map used for the Wumpus 2 (I only played it once or twice), that may be one too.
...well, checkerboard based, as it isn't actually a chess game...


Actually, when Wumpus was first written, but not by me, the author complained that all the other games were "grid based" so he created something "non-grid based". The first map was a Dodecahedron.
I have a few other grid games in my basic books that I may convert to Quest...
I don't think I have any 4E, or 4X games, altho, I do have a few Star Trek based ones.
A sub hunt, (not battleship) Maybe I should call it a "Sub Adventure".
I got 3 books worth to go through!


(edit: some script tweaks)

How would that be figured using radians without a conversion factor?

In exactly the same way; just your heading would be 0.785 rather than 45.
Your calculator's sin/cos functions work in radians anyway; it just converts the angle to radians before doing the calculation.

in radians, you can say "sin(x) = x - (x³/3!) + (x⁵/5!) - (x⁷/7!) + (x⁹/9!) - (x¹¹/11!) + ...." which is relatively easy for a computer to calculate. (the cos formula is similar, but using even numbered powers) If you can punch "sin(45)" into your calculator, then it's multiplying by (pi/180) to get a radian measurement and then using (some version of) that formula.

(and now you've got me wondering how hard it would be to make a sin function in Quest if it didn't already have one. So, just for the sake of experimentation:)

<function name="calculateSin" parameters="angle, precision" type="double">
  // If you're trying to work out the horiz/vert components of moving some distance, then
  //   `distance * calculateSin (angle, distance)` will give an answer accurate to the
  //   nearest square.
  if (precision > 1) {
    precision = 1 / (2*precision + 1)
  }

  result = 0
  power = 1
  numerator = angle
  sign = 1
  factorial = 1
  while ((numerator / factorial) > 0.000001) {
    result = result + (numerator * sign / factorial)
    numerator = numerator * angle * angle
    factorial = factorial * (power+1) * (power+2)
    power = power + 2
    sign = 0 - sign
  }
  return (result)
</function>

I thought of a Quest function... but I would have prefigured the sin table as a split variable and worked from there...


... now my brain's stuck in trig space, I had to do this as well:

<function name="calculatePi" type="double">
  result = 0
  increment = 1
  while (increment > 0.000001) {
    if (calculateSin(result + increment, 0.0000000001) < 0) {
      increment = increment / 2
    }
    else {
      result = result + increment
    }
  }
  return (result)
</function>

I assume this: while (increment > 0.000001) is to get a higher precision?
while (increment > 0.0001) Should work for most needs.


Yeah, just however many decimal places you need it to.
(I haven't checked how well Quest deals with floating point numbers; this was a silly experiment to see if I could do it more than anything else.


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