A few questions from a newbie

  1. How do I compile my quest files into html/js files that can run on pc's without quest?
  2. Is Quest suitable for making large interactive fiction games?
  3. I'm not sure if I'm allowed to talk about this, but if 2 is a no-go, what should I use?

  1. Topic for another more knowledeable coder but I guess the question I would have is “What is the need to do this?” I àssume it would be to port to another website and allow it to be self-standing?
  2. Quest can handle VERY large games. 20MB which is a LOT of code lines. If you add pictures or sounds it gets eaten up pretty quickly though.
  3. Not sure about that as I’ve only used Quest.

First point.
Ask K.V. I have seen him do things like that.
(Creating a log & save system, using Visual Studio to recreate Quest...)

Second point.

20 MB is not large if video games in general are concerned. It is however, quite large for a text adventure. Rarely ever does a text adventure go above 1 MB. I have not seen a text adventure go above 20 MB, unless it was loaded by sound and unnecessary code (which may be par for course for young, inexperienced programmers).

The website itself has a 20 MB upload limit.
You can make a game past 20 MB, if you're using the desktop version...

Third point.

If you want an RPG, I heard RPG maker is good. You'll need to pay for the software, though.

Beyond that, from what I can tell, you can only make your own game from scratch. (Or mod another game, but that's not recommended and not legal if it is to be sold.)


  1. How do I compile my quest files into html/js files that can run on pc's without quest?

First off, if you upload your Quest game to this site, anyone with web browser and an internet connection can play it online. You don't need to convert anything.

...but, if you just want to convert your game to a website, you can try Quest JS.

If you don't add a map, and if you don't use certain newer functions, you can turn your compiled .quest game into a website with it.

Here are some links:

https://github.com/KVonGit/quest-js/raw/master/questjs_20171124_KV.zip

https://github.com/KVonGit/quest-js

Some functions will mess this up. I don't know what all to warn you about, but here's a few of the things we know of:

https://github.com/KVonGit/quest-js/issues

  1. Is Quest suitable for making large interactive fiction games?

I think you can make a game whatever size you like, but the site's upload limit is 20MB.

Like XM says, images, audio, and video are probably all you'd need to worry about, and you could host them somewhere else and link to them (or embed them) in your game.

  1. I'm not sure if I'm allowed to talk about this, but if 2 is a no-go, what should I use?

Inform 7, but you'll still have the same problem.

You can make a 100 mb game (or even bigger) in Quest, as far as I know. (The same goes for Inform 7.)

You just can't upload anything larger than 20 mb here. (That goes for Inform 7, Tads, or HTML games, too. If you have any file larger than 20mb, I'm pretty sure you can't upload it here.)


Argh. Those are the two of the three problems with Quest; turning it into an APP and hosting it on your own website and how the save system works unless you're using Pixie's Save/Load Library, which as far as I know I'm the only one that uses that. I didn't know about the 100mb limitation either, of course, that is a super massive game if you reach that length, mine is only at like 7mb lol xD! I can't even imagine the size of it at 100mb.

Anonynn.


Whoopsy...

I just threw 100 out there as a random number. I don't think Quest actually has a max file size when building a game, but I may be mistaken.


When playing a game compiled with Quest JS, it saves where you leave off automatically, just like Squiffy.

No need to save. It starts you right back where you left off. You have to click restart to start over.


Quest JS was abandoned before Alex finished it by the way.

If you want it to work, I recommend making the most basic game you can at first, then adding one function at a time. That way, you'll know exactly what breaks it (and something will probably break it).

If something does break it, please post about it here (or in the issues on GitHub). We can probably all put our heads together and come up with a simple fix.


By the way: hello, everyone!


J_J

Is the new version of Quest that lets you export into HTML still happening?

Also, question on file size. I'm almost a third of the way done with my game, and it is currently sitting at 17 MB. I'd really like this game to be playable. I have dreams of getting it polished enough to submit to IfComp. Is there some way to make my file smaller after I publish it? I've put so much time into this game, it makes me feel crazy thinking about trying to start over with a different program.


Is the new version of Quest that lets you export into HTML still happening?

If you're referring to Quest 6, I think it's in the 'envisioning' phase, but I'm not really sure. (I just make games and help out when I can. I'm not affiliated with anything or anything.)

I've built what's on GitHub, and the only real difference is the player (aka the runner).


Quest 5.7 (the current version) is what all the focus is on now, I believe.

I've read and read, and it looks like this is what we've got:

  • Quest 5 (currently 5.7)
    • Desktop editor/player for Windows only
    • You can submit games under 20MB to this site, and they can be played online from any device

  • Quest JS (abandoned/incomplete project, BUT a few of us still update things now and then)
    • Turns some .quest files into websites (HTML, CSS, and JS files)
    • Doesn't work with maps.
    • Doesn't work with an unknown amount of functions
    • Verb links don't work

  • Quest 6 (abandoned/incomplete project)
    • Was supposed to end up running on Mac, Linux, Windows, or whatever you had
    • After scouring the blog and the forum and reading the notes from the creator of Quest, I think he hit a brick wall with Quest 6. It appears that he got certain games to play via Gulp, while hosting from your PC (which is not a simple thing to do), but the editor remains Windows only.

  • QuestKit (abandoned/incomplete project)
    • This can be installed if you have npm, but it's totally different from the current version. You have to write your game in YAML. There is no GUI editor. (YAML is fairly easy, though. But QuestKit barely has any functions. You can only create basic text adventures.)

The file size only comes into play when you want to submit a game to the site.

If images, audio, and/or video are the culprit, you can do what XanMag has suggested before and shrink them down by lowering the quality, or you can upload them to another site and embed them in your game with HTML code (which we can help you with, or at least provide solid suggestions).


Also, question on file size. I'm almost a third of the way done with my game, and it is currently sitting at 17 MB...

  1. Do you have images, audio, or video in the folder?

  2. What is the size of your actual .aslx file?


Is there some way to make my file smaller after I publish it? I've put so much time into this game, it makes me feel crazy thinking about trying to start over with a different program.

It depends.

We'd need to know why your .quest file is so large to help you with that.

(See questions 1 and 2 above.)


Also, question on file size. I'm almost a third of the way done with my game, and it is currently sitting at 17 MB...

Do Tools - Publish and check the size of the .quest file; that is the important thing. The file is compressed, and code compresses a lot (images and sounds are probably already compressed so may not reduce in size much at all).


I'm looking at an .aslx file with 51,000+ lines of code right now, and it's just under 8 MB.

The entire folder (not counting the Output folder) is 14 MB.

After building, that 14 MB folder becomes a 7 MB Quest game (name_of_game.quest).


J_J

Thank you. Yes, 17 MB is the size of the published quest file. It looks like that is entirely due to animations... so, I'm going to see how much I can compress those files, hopefully a lot.


You may be able to host animations on another website and link to it using HTML. For a simple GIF, sumething like this:

msg("<img src=\"mydomain/images/animation.gif\">")

For MP3s and stuff it does get more complicated...


Sorry. I guess if you are going to upload to your own website anyway, you shouldn't need to worry about file size.

@J_J you can upload videos to YouTube. Imgur is a good place to upload gifs. You'll have to search on Google for anything else.


When playing a game compiled with Quest JS, it saves where you leave off automatically, just like Squiffy.
No need to save. It starts you right back where you left off. You have to click restart to start over.

This ordinarily wouldn't be a problem but my game is incomplete and given that I provide twice monthly updates that would mean the current Quest Save System would force players to restart over again and again with each update.

The Save/Load library from Pixie allows players to pick up right where they left off with a new update and an old save, it also allows me to potentially switch all of the systems and functions that are in the game over to a second skeleton file (if I do hit a boundary in length) which will allow the player (and me) to pick up where the first part of the game left off in a secondary file (as long as everything is exactly the same in terms of foundation). I think... lol

That's why I think the current Quest save structure needs a major revamp because it doesn't allow for what the library does, players shouldn't have to start all over if you decide to make a hotfix or an update etc, especially if your game is on the long side and they've worked hard to get where they are.

Anonynn.


players shouldn't have to start all over if you decide to make a hotfix or an update etc, especially if your game is on the long side and they've worked hard to get where they are.

I thought someone said the old save game still works online when we update the game?

(I can't remember who said it, and I can't recall testing it. But I was very convinced. I remember that much.)

I'm on the fence on this, anyway.

On one hand, I feel bad if I make someone start over because I updated due to a typo or some mundane error I've found.

On the other, as a player, if you update your game and I'm not finished with it yet, I'm going to restart it so I get the best experience out of it, especially if I'm all into it and stuff.

Now, I admit that I am an Infocom-head. Meaning I'm used to dying for no reason or rendering games unwinnable and having to start all the way over.

I mean, it's a text adventure. You read and write to play it. It's supposed to be hard and time-consuming.

If I breeze through a game that isn't just filled with great jokes every time a turn is taken, I don't feel like I accomplish anything.

Either way, when I see GAME OVER (when I haven't died, hehehe), I'm off to the next game. ...and I'm talking about all the text adventures, not just Quest games. BUT, if there's an update while I'm still into it, I'll start over, get to see all the revised stuff, and probably end up with a better score (if applicable).

Blah, blah... Ramble, ramble...

I also acknowledge the fact that it takes different strokes to rule the world. To each his or her own. (That's what I say.)

Either way, my water is boiling Gotta go drop in the noodles!


PS

I'm not all that fond of the way Squiffy and QuestJS games store your data in local storage. I get the feeling I'll have to delete my browser history due to a major error in one of my scripts one day...


Yes, the old saved game still exists. Try it out for yourself.


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